Investigator Profiles

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

James S. House

Angus Campbell Distinguished University Professor of Sociology, Survey Research & Public Policy, Professor of Sociology, College of LSA, & Professor of Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan.

James S. House, Ph.D. is Angus Campbell Distinguished University Professor of Survey Research, Public Policy, and Sociology. His research career has focused on the role of social and psychological factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, initially on occupational stress and health, then social relationships and support in relation to health, and currently on the role of psychosocial factors in understanding and alleviating social disparities in health and the way health changes with age. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. At the University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy he teaches courses in socioeconomic policy and health policy. He was the initial principal investigator of the CCAHS study starting in 1999 and has continued as PI.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

Jeffrey D. Morenoff

Professor of Sociology, Associate Chair, Department of Sociology, College of LSA, Research Professor, Population Studies Center & Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute fo Social Research, University of Michigan.

Dr. Morenoff's research interests include crime, health, urban neighborhoods, and the analysis of spatial data. He is currently conducting research on the neighborhood context and spatial dynamics of health and crime, differences across generations of Mexican immigrants and racial/ethnic groups in adolescent crime and problem behavior, neighborhood social organization, and the systematic social observation of urban neighborhoods. Dr. Morenoff has been an investigator on Chicago Community Adult Health Study (CCAHS) since the study's inception in 1999 and is currently a co-principal investigator.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

Ana V. Diez-Rouz

Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

Dr. Diez Roux is an epidemiologist with expertise in the social and psychosocial determinants of health. She has been an international leader in the study of neighborhood and community health effects, including multilevel studies that investigate the links between neighborhood characteristics and individual-level health outcomes including behaviors and biomarkers. Other work includes the links between social and economic factors and a variety of biological markers linked to the stress response. Her expertise spans both conceptual and methodological aspects related to the study of health disparities and the social determinants of health. Dr. Diez Roux will take the lead on the gene-environment interaction process of the project, and will be heavily involved in all other aspects of the study. Dr. Diez-Rouz has been an investigator on CCAHS since 2005 and is currently a co-principal investigator.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Jennifer A. Ailshire

National Institute on Aging Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Biodemography and Population Health and the Andrus School of Gerontology, University of Southern California.

Dr. Ailshire's research focuses on understanding how inequality over the life course produces differences in health trajectories and whether the social and physical conditions in which people live explain social disparities in health and health-related behaviors. Dr. Ailshire has worked on the Chicago Community Adult Health Study (CCAHS) since 2003.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Michael D. M. Bader

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar, University of Pennsylvania.

My research investigates patterns of neighborhood residential and economic changes, how investment relates to neighborhood racial and economic changes, and the consequences of investment patterns on racial, ethnic, and economic disparities in nutrition-related diseases. My research demonstrates the persistence of racially-biased residential preferences and knowledge of communities that help perpetuate racial segregation as well as the consequences of segregation for access to health-promoting neighborhood amenities like grocery stores. In addition to my substantive work on racial and economic investment inequality and health disparities, I contribute methodological innovations in the measurement of neighborhood environments including developing novel ways to measure residential preferences, validating current methods of assessing neighborhood resources, and using Google Street View to conduct systematic observations of neighborhood environments on a large geographic scale. Dr. Bader has worked on the CCAHS since 2003.

Curriculum Vitae

PSC Profile

Personal Website

Sarah Burgard

Research Associate Professor, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. Co-Director, Postdoctoral Program, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Michigan. Associate Professor, Epidemiology, University of Michigan.

Dr. Burgard's research focuses on the way systems of stratification and inequality impact the health of people and populations. She currently has two main projects; the first focuses on socioeconomic, gender, and racial/ethnic and immigrant status-based disparities in working lives and the relationships between working careers and health. In this work, Dr. Burgard has researched the health consequences of involuntary job loss, perceived job insecurity, and nonstandard employment contracts in the United States. She is also a primary investigator on the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study a new panel of about 900 adults in Southeast Michigan that entered the field in fall 2009 to assess experiences and consequences of the current serious recession and their links with economic well-being and health. A second area of research examines the consequences of social stratification and inequality for maternal and child health and adolescent outcomes across many countries, with a particular focus on South Africa and China. Dr. Burgard has been an investigator on the CCAHS since 2005.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

Personal Website

Philippa J. Clarke

Research Associate Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

My research interests are in social epidemiology, social gerontology, life course perspectives, models of disability, and population health. I am primarily interested in the social determinants of health at both the micro and macro levels of social reality and at the intersection of these levels as well. My current work examines the role of the built environment on mobility disability, cognitive function, and social participation (with data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Survey); the effect of the urban environment on disability trajectories over time (with national data from the Americans' Changing Lives Study); the health and social factors influencing the use of assistive devices (with data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging); and cross-national disparities in disability and psychosocial resources (comparing data from the US Health and Retirement Study and the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing). I am currently funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through a career development (K01) award to use geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the relationship between the built environment and disability progression, and to identify whether older adults living in less accessible neighborhoods are more likely to be admitted to a nursing home over time. Dr. Clarke has been an investigator on the CCAHS since 2005.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

Personal Website

Michael R. Elliott

Associate Professor, Biostatistics, University of Michigan. Associate Research Scientist, Survey Research Center, University of Michigan. Research Affiliate, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan.

Dr. Elliott's research interests include the design and analysis of sample surveys, U.S. Census undercount, and missing and latent variable data structures with applications to causal estimation and modeling. Recently he has explored potential outcome models to estimate causal effects in a variety of diverse settings, including longitudinal clinical trials and toxicology studies. Dr. Elliott has been an investigator on the Chicago Community Adult Health Study (CCAHS) since 2006.