ISR Insights Speaker Series

School Mental Health in the Detroit Public Schools Community District

Robin Jacob (Research Associate Professor, SRC; Research Associate Professor, School Of Education; Co-Director Youth Policy Lab) and Elizabeth Koschmann (Assistant Research Scientist, Michigan Medicine; TRAILS Program Director)

Tuesday, August 25 at 11am EST: https://umich.zoom.us/j/98456054707

Robin Jacob

In recent years, rates of child and adolescent mental illness have skyrocketed. Nearly half of adolescents in the United States will experience symptoms of a mental illness before age 18, and one in five will be severely impaired by their symptoms. Among youth ages 10-24, suicide has become the second leading cause of death, killing almost 8,000 young people annually. These problems may be acerbated in urban, high poverty schools. There is evidence of higher rates of both mental illness and self-injury and suicidal behavior in communities of color which is hypothesized to reflect the impact of systemic racism, as well as significant racial disparities in access to high quality health and mental health care. Schools are uniquely positioned to identify and respond to students’ mental health care needs, and to reduce widespread inequities in access to effective prevention and early intervention services. However, only limited data is available on the prevalence and pattern of mental health challenges in urban schools or about the school or district resources available to address those challenges.

Elizabeth Koschmann

This study presents data collected as part of a partnership between TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students), the Youth Policy Lab, and the Detroit Public Schools Community District. In 2019, our study team collected survey data from nearly 3,500 DPSCD teachers, administrators, school staff, almost 11,000 students, and 800 families. In this talk, Drs. Robin Jacob and Elizabeth Koschmann share findings on (1) the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and exposure to traumatic events among students, (2) the degree to which these are associated with school engagement, absences, and other behaviors, and (3) the challenges staff and district administrators face in providing mental health services for their students.

 


The American National Election Study: History and Insights from Recent Surveys

Vincent Hutchings (Professor, Department of Political Science; Research Professor, Center for Political Studies)

Wednesday, Aug 12, 11am EST
https://youtu.be/QQ1ghL5zh5M

Why does America vote as it does on Election Day? Since 1948, the American National Election Studies (ANES) has provided data to inform explanations of election outcomes in the United States. The ANES provides survey data from a nationally representative sample of American adults to give researchers a view of the political world through the eyes of ordinary citizens.

Vincent Hutchings

In this ISR Insights talk, Dr. Vincent Hutchings (Professor, Department of Political Science; Research Professor, Center for Political Studies) discusses the history of ANES and why it remains an essential resource for the social sciences. He talks about the study’s approach to data collection and instrumentation in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, which includes conducting surveys through a combination of Internet, video, and telephone interviews. Dr. Hutchings also highlights politically-relevant results from recent studies, including attitudes on the Black Lives Matter movement.


Mental Health and Well-being Among Older Americans During the Pandemic: The COVID-19 Coping Study

Jessica Finlay (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Social Environment and Health, ISR) and Lindsay Kobayashi (Assistant Professor, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health)

Wednesday, July 15, 1pm

Lindsay C. Kobayashi

Lindsay C. Kobayashi

Jessica Finlay

Jessica Finlay

COVID-19 has both immediate and long-term consequences for the health and well-being of Americans. Older adults are not only at higher risk for severe illness from the disease, but may also be especially vulnerable to social and emotional harms associated with the pandemic. In this ISR Insights talk, Drs. Jessica Finlay (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Social Environment and Health, ISR) and Lindsay Kobayashi (Assistant Professor, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health) discuss insights from the COVID-19 Coping Study of nearly 7,000 adults aged 55+ from across the country. The talk shares participants’ perspectives and diverse experiences during the first upswing of the pandemic, including major sources of stress and ways of coping.

 


Wealth and the Persistence of Racial Inequality

Fabian Pfeffer (Research Associate Professor, Survey Research Center, ISR; Faculty Associate, Population Studies Center, ISR; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; and Founding Director, Center for Inequality Dynamics)

Wednesday, June 17

Fabian Pfeffer

Fabian Pfeffer

As the country grapples with its persistent problem of racial injustice, this ISR Insights talk will focus on one aspect of long-standing racial inequality — gaps in family wealth. Featuring new findings on the depth and persistence of racial wealth gaps, Fabian Pfeffer (Research Associate Professor, Survey Research Center, ISR; Faculty Associate, Population Studies Center, ISR; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; and Founding Director, Center for Inequality Dynamics) will clarify why rising levels of wealth inequality present a major challenge to the economic prosperity and opportunity of most families in this country.


Motor City at a Standstill: Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Detroit

Jeffrey Morenoff (Professor, Sociology and Public Policy; Director, Population Studies Center) and Lydia Wileden (PhD Candidate, Sociology and Public Policy; Population Studies Center trainee)

Wednesday, June 3

Lydia WiledenJeffrey MorenoffSince the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, Detroit has emerged as an epicenter of the crisis. To date, more than 1300 Detroiters have died from a coronavirus infection and 43 percent of city residents have lost their jobs. In this ISR Insights talk, Jeffrey Morenoff (Professor, Sociology and Public Policy; Director, Population Studies Center) and Lydia Wileden (PhD Candidate, Sociology and Public Policy; Population Studies Center trainee) will discuss efforts by the Detroit Metro Area Communities Study — a panel study of more than 1100 Detroiters — to capture the real-time experiences of Detroiters and share insights from two survey waves on the dramatic financial precarity facing many Detroit households and the behavioral and economic changes residents are making to get by.

The Kids are Not All Right: Educational Inequalities in the Time of COVID-19

Pamela Davis-Kean, Professor of Psychology and Research Professor at ISR

Wednesday, May 20

Pamela Davis-KeanWith schools closed due to the COVID19 virus, the teaching and learning environments for children have now merged into one place–the home. With schools being the “great equalizer” for education opportunities, what does it mean for families to provide assistance and much of the teaching during the quarantine and what challenges will schools face if they are able to open in the fall? Dr. Davis-Kean will discuss her research on the inequalities in educational opportunities and what that means for families, schools, and children as this unprecedented crisis is potentially increasing achievement gaps across the country.

These webinar series focus on the research happening at ISR. If there is a topic you would like to see featured or have an idea for a future presentation, please email abeattie@umich.edu.