A. Regula Herzog Young Investigators Fund

The A. Regula Herzog Young Investigators Fund of the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan was established by the students, colleagues and friends of Regula Herzog to honor her as a mentor for young investigators and as a survey researcher of older populations. Junior researchers, including Research Assistant Scientists, Research Investigators, Research Assistant Professors, Postdoctoral Fellows and Predoctoral Students are eligible. Applicants must be affiliated with the Survey Research Center or one of its projects. The goals of the Fund are to support the research and training activities of junior researchers at the Survey Research Center, with a special preference given to those who are engaged in research on older populations.

Allowable expenses may include research supplies and services, conference expenses, training opportunities, travel (related to conferences, workshops and training or to support research collaborations across institutions), and memberships in professional organizations. Predoctoral Students and Postdoctoral Fellows may include participation in summer courses offered by SRC and ICPSR. Awards are intended for use within one year, but may be extended upon request for six more months.

Application Process

Please see the Fellowships & Awards Homepage for award amounts and application deadlines, updated at the beginning of each calendar year. The application can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/72757. The application requires:

  1. Proposal – Brief [three-page, single-spaced] description of the proposed activities and their intellectual relationship to the U-M ISR Survey Research Center. A description of the proposed uses for the funds and how these uses will benefit the candidate.
  2. CV
  3. Letter of Recommendation – Letter of nomination from the project’s Principal Investigator stating how this work is related to the project.

As part of the application process, there are questions that ask for some of the same information as above. Those questions are meant to be answered in about 3 sentences.

If you have any questions about the award process, please send an email to umisr-awards@umich.edu.

Additional Expectations

  • At one year mark, you will be asked to share an update about the status of your research.
  • Acknowledge ISR and this award’s support in publications and presentations.

A. Regula Herzog Young Investigators Recipients

Mengyao Hu, 2019 – An Analysis of Memory Effects in the HRS Life History Mail Survey
Haena Lee, 2018 – Are Childhood Adverse Exposures a Threat to Successful Aging?

Allison Brenner, 2017 – Environmental Barriers and Facilitators of Access to Healthcare for Elderly Stroke Survivors
Kate Duchowny, 2017 – Muscle Weakness and Physical Disability in Older Americans
Lauren Schmitz, 2017 – Life Course Determinants of Epigenetic Age Acceleration in the Health and Retirement Study

Erin Ware, 2016 – The Effects of Measurement Choices on Phenotype and Genotype on Estimated Genetic Contribution of Depressive Symptoms in the Health and Retirement Study

Heidi Guyer, 2015 – Sleep and Diet Patterns of Women Aged 50 to 75 with Type II Diabetes
Apoorva Jadhav, 2015 – The Health and Economic Well-Being of Widows in a Global Context

Tara Queen, 2012 – The Influence of Health on Global and Experienced Well-Being

Jessica Broome, 2011 – How Interviewers’ Vocal and Verbal Attributes Affect Differential Success in Recruiting Respondents
Sunghee Lee, 2011 – Cross-Cultural Measurement Properties of the Self-Reported Health Scale

Joanne Hsu, 2010 – The Effects of a Member’s Cognitive Decline on the Household Management of Finances

Jennifer Ailshire, 2009 – Associations between Neighborhood Social Context and Levels of Social Engagement among Residents
Brooke Helppie, 2009 – The Interactions between the Personal and Professional Lives of Early-Career PhD Economists
Lauren Hersch Nicholas, 2009 – The Role of Public Policy in Improving Health Care Quality, Health and Retirement Outcomes for the Elderly Population
Lindsay Ryan, 2009 – Interindividual Differences and Change in Cognition and Well-Being across Adulthood

Ishtar Govia, 2008 – Longitudinal Associations between Women’s Relationships and their Health

Jessica Faul, 2007 – The Influence of Life Course Socioeconomic Position on Cognitive Function and Change in Older Age

Elena Gouskova, 2006 – The Relationship Between Commuting Time on Health using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics
Sonja Ziniel, 2006 – Influence of Cognitive Aging on Response Strategies with Specific Attention to Behavioral Frequency Measures

Leticia Marteleto, 2005 – Divorce and Intergenerational Transfers in the Health and Retirement Study
Ayse Uskul, 2005 – Systematic Differences in How Questions Influence Responses in Different Cultures

Gwenith Fisher, 2003 – The Complex Interrelationships Between Work, Health, and Retirement Choices

Jessica Francis, 2020 – Online Health Community Intervention for LGBT Older Adults

To support this fund and make future awards possible, please visit our Next Generation Giving Page.